Director Ingmar Bergman and Sweden

Trial and Error, Stockholm – Ingmar Bergman died July 30, 2007, 89 years old (on the same day that director Michelangelo Antonioni passed away). I’d like to mention his influence on the image of Sweden, and the Swedish view on Bergman.


INGMAR BERGMAN AND THE IMAGE OF SWEDEN:
Bergman’s way of portraying his country in his films had a massive impact in the 1950s and 1960s. Around the world the people of Sweden was regarded as brooding, depressed and consumed by guilt. And Sweden itself was, according to the American Associated Press: ”the claustrophobic gloom of unending winter nights, its glowing summer evenings”.

Then, in the 1970s, Bergman involuntary changed the international view on Sweden again. It was in 1976 that the Swedish tax administration began a witch hunt on the director, who was brought from the theater by uniformed police. This was later recognized as the work of power hungry administrators and he was freed from all charges, but he was mentally broken. Around the world, the view of Sweden as a Soviet in miniature was cabled out.

This made not only Bergman aware that ”anyone in this country can be attacked and humiliated by a special kind of bureaucracy that is growing like a raving cancer”. At the same time, Swedish author Astrid Lindgren (writer of ”Pippi Longstocking”) was supposed to pay 102% in marginal taxes. Stories like these did not only change the view of Sweden, it also had its consequences within the country and the social democratic party lost the next election after 44 years in power.

THE SWEDISH VIEW ON INGMAR BERGMAN:
Sweden doesn’t have that many inernational celebrities, but we are very focused on formulating our country, inwards and outwards. Ingmar Bergman is therefore important to us in more ways than first meet the eye. Our icons are getting too old (like the botanist Carl von Linné and the mysticist Emanuel Swedenborg) or to well used (like the pop group ABBA or tennisplayer Björn Borg). What we want is someone to represent Sweden NOW, and rather not just anyone internationally important (like Hans Blix), but someone who put our country on the map. Or, to be frank, someone who indulge us by devoting time on the Swedes.

Ingmar Bergman did this. He has (reluctantly) become a natioal monument in Sweden, and now that he is dead we want to honor him. But how, where and by whom? The competition is on, and many voices are heard within a few days after his death.
How many Ingmar Bergman streets can we have in Stockholm, for example? If there is more than one there might be some confusion, so one enthusiastic politician reasoned ”one can change the name a little, call it ”Director Bergmans street” or something like that.” A lot of new books are being written, TV is finally showing his films again, and a few days after his death we learned that we will get a new stamp with Bergmans face on it. Further more, we already have one important Bergman monument since the massive Ingmar Bergman Archive has been inscribed in the UNESCO ”Memory of the World Register”.

I personally like Bergman a lot, I think there is nothing more natural than some form of memorial. But lets not get to whimsical – lets focus on what counts. Danish director Lars von Trier (”Dogville”) put his finger on it the other day:
”Bergman is by many charactarised as a genius. But there is only one way to celebrate the genius and that is by making his films accessible. He might be concidered as kind of a national monument in Sweden, but it is the films that is the monument. It is a scandal that they are not available for everyone to see!”
Lets start there, I say.

Some recommended reading: Ingmar Bergmans two fundamental books, ”The Magic Lantern” and ”Images: My life in film”; The official Ingmar Bergman website; Interview with Lars von Trier (Swe); The Daily Astorian on Bergman; and a Playboy-interview with Bergman from 1964

2 Responses to “Director Ingmar Bergman and Sweden”


  1. 1 neli June 19, 2008 at 9:05 pm

    I’m an American woman, mother and grandmother of some Swedish ancestry. My home is in a wilderness area of California and I recall spending precious nights with an elderly poet friend and neighbor watching Ingmar Bergman’s fine and memorable films. Since my Swedish/Norwegian father passed away when I was four years of age, Bergman’s films assisted me in glimpsing the bare boned and reflective qualities of Sweden’s inner and outer landscapes. Those evenings of full engagement in the refined mastery of
    Bergman’s films remain a significant and happy memory since my friend’s passing at
    87 years.

  2. 2 procera avh July 4, 2013 at 6:55 pm

    So instead of strolling at a constant tempo for say an hour, you’ll change points up by alternating quick bursts of intense strolling for say a minute followed by a recovery time period with slower walking after just about every intense time period. Just continue to keep alternating for 20 minutes to start and include time while you become much more match. You are able to use interval training with all phases of your procera avh to boost your success.

    Also after you do any form of exercising it is actually strongly advised you drink lots of water just before all through and immediately after to help keep your whole body effectively hydrated.


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